Stem Cell Injections, PRP and . . . Prolotherapy

Enhanced Solutions for Many Common Pain Presentations


The Taub Group - Charlotte, NC
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The Cost-Effective Option for
Treatment-Resistant Chronic Pain
Neal Taub, MD:

Have you considered stem cell injections or platelet-rich plasma (PRP) for your chronic knee pain but were discouraged by the high out-of-pocket cost? A lower-cost but highly effective advanced treatment is available for knee, back, heel, shoulder pain, and more.

You should consider prolotherapy. Prolotherapy involves injecting a concentrated glucose solution rather than platelets or stem cells. It appears to work by stimulating healing, much the same way that PRP and stem cell injections may work.

The main difference is cost. Stem cell injections average $5,000 - not covered by insurance. PRP averages $1,000 per injection, with several injections usually required — also not covered by insurance.

At The Taub Group, prolotherapy costs $200-$300 per session,* with a series of 4 sessions recommended. Although prolotherapy is not covered by insurance or Medicaid/Medicare, the cost is a small fraction of the cost of PRP or stem cell injections.

Over fifty research articles have found prolotherapy to be an effective treatment for back and joint pain. On the other hand, the research on PRP and stem cell injections shows them to be modestly effective, if that.

A recent quote from a review in a prestigious orthopedic journal states, "In conclusion, the efficacy of cellular (stem cell) therapy injections has not yet been established. The value . . . of cell therapy in orthopedics remains unclear”.

In contrast, the effectiveness of prolotherapy has been demonstrated in multiple research trials. A recent quote from a very large review of much of the research on prolotherapy notes, “The results of this . . . review indicate that . . . prolotherapy conferred a positive, significant beneficial effect . . . in the treatment of knee OA (arthritis with chronic pain)”.

Please call today for a no cost phone or in-office consultation for prolotherapy injections.




Research Shows Prolotherapy Improves These Conditions Even After Conventional Approaches Fail

Knee Pain / Knee Osteoarthritis1-3
Shoulder Pain (Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy)4
Tennis Elbow (lateral epicondylosis)5,6
Ankle Pain (Achilles Tendinopathy)7,8
Groin Pain (Groin Adductor Tendinopathy)9
Heel Pain (Chronic Plantar Fasciopathy)10
Dysfunctional Sacroiliac Joint11,12
Coccygodynia13

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SPAM CHECK: What is 1 plus 1?


Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Prolotherapy results in superior long-term pain improvement compared to physical therapy plus placebo.
Depression research with LDN
Substantial reduction of chronic shoulder pain.




Learn more about pain medicine options in Charlotte, NC.



Telephone
Toll-Free: (866) 886-3709
Local: (704) 442-9805
Address
3535 Randolph Rd
Suite 208
Charlotte, NC 28211



References
  1. Rabago D, Patterson J, Mundt M. Dextrose prolotherapy for knee osteoarthritis: a randomized controlled trial. Ann Fam Med. 2013; 11: 229-37.
  2. Hassan F, Trebinjac S, Murrelll W, Maffulli N. The effectiveness of prolotherapy in treating knee osteoarthritis in adults: a systematic review. British Medical Bulletin. 2017; 122 (1): 91-108.
  3. Rabago D, Lee K, Ryan M. Hypertonic dextrose and morrhuate sodium injections (prolotherapy) for lateral epicondylosis (tennis elbow): results of a single-blind, pilot level, randomized controlled trial. Am J Phys Med Rehabil. 2013; 92: 587-96.
  4. Trebinjac S, Kitchbi H, et al. Long-term effect of prolotherapy on symptomatic rotator cuff tendinopathy. Journal of Health Sciences. 2015; 5 (3): 93-8.
  5. Rabago D, Lee K, Ryan M. Hypertonic dextrose and morrhuate sodium injections (prolotherapy) for lateral epicondylosis (tennis elbow): results of a single-blind, pilot level, randomized controlled trial. Am J Phys Med Rehabil. 2013; 92: 587-96.
  6. Scarpone M, Rabago D, Zgierska A. the efficacy of prolotherapy for lateral epicondylosis: a pilot study. Clin J Sport Med. 2008; 18: 248-54.
  7. Maxwell N, Ryan M, Taunton J, et al. Sonographically guided intratendinous injection of hypersmolar dextrose to treat chronic tendinosis of the Achilles tendon: A pilot study. AJR Am J Roentgenol. 2007; 189: W215-20.
  8. Yelland M, Sweeting K, Lyftogt J, et al. Prolotherapy injections and eccentric loading exercises for painful Achilles tendinosis: a randomised trial. Br J Sports Med. 2011; 45: 421-8.
  9. Topol G, Reeves K, Hassanein K. Efficacy of dextrose prolotherapy in elite male kicking-sport athletes with groin pain. Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2005; 86: 697-702.
  10. Ryan M, Wong A, Gilies J, et al. Sonographically guided intratendinous injections of hyperosmolar dextrose/lidocaine: A pilot study for the treatment of chronic plantar/fasciitis. Br J Sports Med. 2009; 43: 303-6.
  11. Kim W, Lee H, Jeong C, et al . A randomized controlled trial of intraarticular prolotherapy versus steroid injection for sacroiliac joint pain. J Altern Complement Med. 2010; 16: 1285-90.
  12. Lee J, Lee D, Jeong C, et al. Effects of intraarticular prolotherapy on sacroiliac joint pain. Korean J Pain. 2009; 22 (3): 229-33.
  13. Khan S, Kumar A, Varshney M, et al. Dextrose prolotherapy for recalcitrant coccygodynia. J Orthop Surg. 2008; 16 (1): 27-9.

*Price ranges current as of March 21, 2019. Please review current costs of your prescribed treatment plan during your consultation.

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